Typography Project 1: Letters

Above are 11 fonts that I used references to recreate on paper with pen and pencil. The process was very captivating, because it allowed me to learn a lot about the unique qualities of each font style. I learned more about the importance to be precise and pay attention to detail. The first two letters of each type face are chosen by my professor as exemplary of the font, then I was tasked to pick an additional letter that I felt was emblematic of the font. Bulleted below is a list of the letters in the order they appear along with the explanation behind the letter I chose to include.

  • Slab Serif – Clarendon Roman: I chose the capital “X” as the most emblematic letter of this font style. I chose this because the “X” completely personifies what makes the font most unique, the large slabs that extend off of each extremity.
  • Oldstyle – Bembo Regular: I chose the capital “T” as the most emblematic letter because of the way it looks like a sword hilt. Its slabs are not as nearly bulky and large as Slab Serif’s, but they still exist and are much different. They look a lot more like the talons of a bird, and so I chose a letter that used those slabs to reflect a sort of symbol.
  • Blackletter – Old English Text Regular: I chose the capital “S” as the most emblematic letter because whenever I see this “S” I immediately think of this font. It’s a very unique letter and no other font reflects its complexity.
  • Script- Snell Roundhand: I chose the capital “Q” as the most emblematic letter because of how abstract it is. Whenever I see this letter I honestly mistake it for a “2” but when you reference it as script you immediately know its a letter and not a number. However, I always struggle with whether its a “Z” or a “Q” and I’m always surprised to find it’s a “Q.”
  • Italic – Adobe Garamond Premiere Pro Italic: I chose the lowercase “k” as the most emblematic letter of this font. This is because the lowercase “k” is very unique in the way that it is almost continuous, and script-like, in the way that it appears as one continuous stroke.
  • Grotesque San Serif – Grotesque Regular: I really hate this font, mostly because of the way the opening of the “g” that creates and “o” shape isn’t centered within the outer “o” shape of the “g.” However, this characteristic is what makes this font so unique, so I chose a similar letter for the same reasons, lowercase “d.”
  • Neo-Grotesque San Serif – Helvetica: I chose the lowercase “f” for this font because of its highest extremity, which creates the curve to form the “f” rather than a “t.” I chose this because in most fonts, the “f” arches down towards the cross that would make it a “t.” In this case, the “f” has hardly any curve at all, rather, it has a curved angle.
  • Humanist San Serif – Gill Sans Regular: If I were to choose a most emblematic letter it would have been the lowercase “t” but because we have already had that chosen for us, I chose the lowercase “g.” The lowercase “g” is most emblematic because instead of having an open curve at its lowest extremity it has a closed curve which creates an oval. This in a sense creates a sense of continuity throughout the “g.”
  • Serif/Sans Serif Families – PT: For this font I chose the capital “Q” for the most emblematic letter of this font. This is because the “Q” usually has a cross that enters from its center and continues through the outside of the “Q.” In this font, this part of the “Q” does not enter the “Q” at all, rather, it is detached and descends below the Q.
  • Geometric San Serif: I chose the capital “W” for this font because this letter seems to be the largest letter of the font and it also captures the points of the corners in the type quite well.
  • Transitional – Baskerville Regular: I chose the capital “Q” as the most emblematic of this font because of the way the cross forms a sort of “z” underneath the letter.
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